Session 1

Cecilia
Class 1A

Principles


Hierarchy

With a dominant, a sub-dominant and a subordinate element

IMG_0557 IMG_0558The importance of color, orientation and position are tackled in this next picture

Balance

Visual balance

Symmetry

IMG_0559

Asymmetry

IMG_0561

C.R.A.P.

Alignment

IMG_0562

Contrast

IMG_0564

Visual Effects

Closure

IMG_0565

Movement

IMG_0566

Homework

asymmetry y continuityContinuity and Movement

closure y dominant by difference2Asymmetry and Dominant by difference RULE13 Y EDGEALIGNMENT2

Rule of 1/3 and Edge alignment

Movement and continuityClosure and Stability symmetry and stability

Symmetry and Rule of 1/3

Conversation

Neko
Thanks, good work overall, although I feel it would be better if you tried to use less elements and emphasize more the principle you illustrate in each image. For example, symmetry and movement images worked really well, but alignment, contrast and hierarchy #2 (dominant by difference) not so much as it's hard to figure out what you wanted to show. For your homework, try to work with max 5 elements (to start with) and we'll see how that goes.
Neko
Homework: these 5 images are looking very nice! A couple of comments, to make them even better. First, it looks you may be a little confused as to how exactly to use rule of 1/3. That's ok, because I know you may feel like "how should I align objects along these rule-of-1/3 axes, should they be edge-aligned with them or centered?" and the answer is- basically it can be both, depending really on your shapes. For example, the bottle image I understand very well what you wanted to do: But feels like this may have been a better composition, which in this case would "center" the bottle along the 1/3 axis: . Please note that at any rate, this bottle image is too left-heavy, it needs something on the right side to balance it. On the other hand with the "cookies"composition, the shape feel better "edge aligned" with 1/3 lines. You would just need to increase the contrast between the different shapes/zones of the image to emphasize that. It could be more symmetrical looking (very similar to your image, just slightly more contrast): or like this (more vertically asymmetrical composition):