Session 1C | Nov 15, 2015
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Session 1C | Nov 15, 2015

15minutes sketch


Tamami Okada

Nuclear Disarmament

a15-minute sketches again
b c

*I did sketches with pen-tablet

q1q2 q3

Discussion

6 responses to “15minutes sketch”

  1. Neko says:

    Excellent, these are very mature sketches. If you have time, just for the sake of exercise, see if you can come out with several “optimistic” concepts. Most of these are slightly pessimistic “don’t play with fire” messages – which are perfectly ok, but just wanted you to try a completely opposite direction and see what comes out. Sometimes it’s very useful trying to think of two completely contradictory directions for the project – there is always something new to learn from that! :)

  2. Neko says:

    I am amazed by the quality of the “nuclear free sketches” in terms of quality of the drawing! Although I still think conceptually the one with the baby holding a rocket is the strongest one. And the one with politicians shaking hands is very funny because of the figure in the bottom that looks like an alien saying “Great! Now that you no longer have nuclear weapons, I can EAT the planet!” :)

  3. Neko says:

    As I mentioned in the class, and in the post I just made in 1D category of this website, I think you should try to do illustration in Illustrator (or Photoshop). Learning this program will greatly help you develop more skills and more complex thinking about the work you do, even if you choose to continue working by hand.
    As for the actual poster, I think that a style that is geometric with flat colors would look really well. You can take a look at work Ryo Takemasa, or -much older- Ryohei Yanagihara who served as an inspiration for all this style.
    Also, you may want to look at Owen Davey, who posts a lot about his process. There are some videos of his process at:https://vimeo.com/owendavey Please note that he uses Photoshop, but most of it can be (even more easily) done in Illustrator, with Photoshop just giving some texture as a finishing touch.
    There’s another cool illustrator, Andrew Kolb, who posts a lot about his process, again starting from very small sketches.
    http://news.kolbisneat.com/post/69077998604/process-post-brother-kolb
    Search for “Andrew Kolb process” you will find more articles like this. :)

  4. Tamami Okada says:

    Thank you very much for the links and advice! Very inspiring!
    I have one question;
    You suggest me to draw with illustrator or photoshop but I usually draw with pentablet with paintool called SAI.
    It’s basically the same as photoshop but it has anti-shake pencil tool that makes me easier to draw but what is the major benefit to draw with photoshop or illustrator?

  5. Neko says:

    SAI sounds interesting, I never tried it.
    The benefits? At first it can teach you to have more precise control over shapes and more defined edges. For example:
    – You draw something by hand (or even maybe in SAI).
    – Then you import that in Illustrator, and draw using Pen tool. That gives you a lot of control so that you can fine tune the shapes, curves to get the best aesthetic effect.
    – After that, you can add effects either in Illustrator or Photoshop, but you will have much sharper edges and better defined shapes than you would normally have by painting via tablet.
    When I refer to “controlled edges” I mean a kind of Illustration that rely of very thought of composition of shapes, which is what usually is in very high demand on a job market for Illustrators. Although, of course it all depends on a style.

    Another benefit of Illustrator is that you get drawing in vector format, which means that you can print it at any size you want. Also, you can easily change the drawing by replacing one color with other, adding outlines to shapes, etc… because each shape is object that you can select and edit.
    And as for Photoshop, it gives just so much control over image with layers and effects that you can use, that simply no other program ever comes close. And I know that because in the last 20 years I’ve tried them all, and often wanted to find a replacement for Photoshop.
    At any rate, it’s very useful to know. And it might be interesting for you to try to pass the image from one program to other (SAI, Illustrator and Photoshop) and see if that results in something…
    We’ll talk more in class :)

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